Waria is the Indonesian word for a transgender woman. It is a mix between the word pria, which means man, and wanita, which means woman.   Indonesia has a long history of warias. Before colonialism many tribes embraced their transgender members. They were seen in society as spiritual beings, as people who had two souls occupying one body.  Miska, a transgender sex worker, rides a public bus to work. She works on the tracks of a running train every night.

Waria is the Indonesian word for a transgender woman. It is a mix between the word pria, which means man, and wanita, which means woman. 

Indonesia has a long history of warias. Before colonialism many tribes embraced their transgender members. They were seen in society as spiritual beings, as people who had two souls occupying one body.

Miska, a transgender sex worker, rides a public bus to work. She works on the tracks of a running train every night.

 The life of a waria in Indonesia today is much different. They are not seen as people by the majority of society.   People walk by a group of warias gathered for and LGTBQ rally in the city center of Jarkata. Visibility and recognition of the gay and waria communities in Jakarta  has increased, but there is still a long way to go until they are seen and treated as equal.

The life of a waria in Indonesia today is much different. They are not seen as people by the majority of society. 

People walk by a group of warias gathered for and LGTBQ rally in the city center of Jarkata. Visibility and recognition of the gay and waria communities in Jakarta  has increased, but there is still a long way to go until they are seen and treated as equal.

 Miska begins putting on her makeup before at her home. The makeup application is a very important ritual for a waria. Miska doesn't wear makeup when she is at home, but always puts it on before leaving the house. 

Miska begins putting on her makeup before at her home. The makeup application is a very important ritual for a waria. Miska doesn't wear makeup when she is at home, but always puts it on before leaving the house. 

 There are common threads in the lives of many warias. Sex work is one, mainly because there aren't many job opportunities for warias who live openly. They are seen as sex objects by men, or as a spectacle at nightclubs. They are often the victims of sexual violence and homicide.   Miska, right, and a friend sit on the edge of the train tracks waiting for clients. Miska said she is physically attacked and raped while working at least two times a year, if not more.

There are common threads in the lives of many warias. Sex work is one, mainly because there aren't many job opportunities for warias who live openly. They are seen as sex objects by men, or as a spectacle at nightclubs. They are often the victims of sexual violence and homicide. 

Miska, right, and a friend sit on the edge of the train tracks waiting for clients. Miska said she is physically attacked and raped while working at least two times a year, if not more.

  Miska waits for a moto-taxi on the street after leaving the safe house. Miska hopes to one day stop being a sex worker and own her own restaurant because she loves to cook.

 Miska waits for a moto-taxi on the street after leaving the safe house. Miska hopes to one day stop being a sex worker and own her own restaurant because she loves to cook.

 The pain inflicted upon them by an unwelcoming society does not stop many warias from building their own communities and working together toward the dream of an Indonesia that accepts and embraces their existence.  A group of warias at Mami Yuli's waria safehouse outside of Jakarta.

The pain inflicted upon them by an unwelcoming society does not stop many warias from building their own communities and working together toward the dream of an Indonesia that accepts and embraces their existence.

A group of warias at Mami Yuli's waria safehouse outside of Jakarta.

 Mumun, who lives permanently at the safehouse, helps a young waria, Intan, put on make-up. Mumun, like many warias, worked as a sex worker and then when she got older became a cosmetologist. Intan is currently working as a sex worker. 

Mumun, who lives permanently at the safehouse, helps a young waria, Intan, put on make-up. Mumun, like many warias, worked as a sex worker and then when she got older became a cosmetologist. Intan is currently working as a sex worker. 

 A group of young warias play around at Mami Yuli's salon in Jakarta. Mami's salon is known through out Jakarta as the heart of the waria community. 

A group of young warias play around at Mami Yuli's salon in Jakarta. Mami's salon is known through out Jakarta as the heart of the waria community. 

 Miska smokes a cigarette at a corner store across from the railroad tracks. The specific section of railroad tracks she works on is for waria prostitutes only. They work to keep out any "real women" prositutes. 

Miska smokes a cigarette at a corner store across from the railroad tracks. The specific section of railroad tracks she works on is for waria prostitutes only. They work to keep out any "real women" prositutes. 

 Intan and her boyfriend cuddle up to each other at Miska's home. Intan says that she hopes to one day live again as a "normal male". 

Intan and her boyfriend cuddle up to each other at Miska's home. Intan says that she hopes to one day live again as a "normal male". 

 Miska walks down the street on her way to work at the railroad tracks on a rainy night.

Miska walks down the street on her way to work at the railroad tracks on a rainy night.

 Oma, a 71-year-old waria, sits on a bed in the safehouse. Oma quit wearing traditional women's clothing years ago because she feels to old to do it anymore, but said she will always be a woman in her soul. Aging is hard in the waria community. Many warias are disowned by their families and if they reach old age they have no where to go. 

Oma, a 71-year-old waria, sits on a bed in the safehouse. Oma quit wearing traditional women's clothing years ago because she feels to old to do it anymore, but said she will always be a woman in her soul. Aging is hard in the waria community. Many warias are disowned by their families and if they reach old age they have no where to go. 

 Waria is the Indonesian word for a transgender woman. It is a mix between the word pria, which means man, and wanita, which means woman.   Indonesia has a long history of warias. Before colonialism many tribes embraced their transgender members. They were seen in society as spiritual beings, as people who had two souls occupying one body.  Miska, a transgender sex worker, rides a public bus to work. She works on the tracks of a running train every night.
 The life of a waria in Indonesia today is much different. They are not seen as people by the majority of society.   People walk by a group of warias gathered for and LGTBQ rally in the city center of Jarkata. Visibility and recognition of the gay and waria communities in Jakarta  has increased, but there is still a long way to go until they are seen and treated as equal.
 Miska begins putting on her makeup before at her home. The makeup application is a very important ritual for a waria. Miska doesn't wear makeup when she is at home, but always puts it on before leaving the house. 
 There are common threads in the lives of many warias. Sex work is one, mainly because there aren't many job opportunities for warias who live openly. They are seen as sex objects by men, or as a spectacle at nightclubs. They are often the victims of sexual violence and homicide.   Miska, right, and a friend sit on the edge of the train tracks waiting for clients. Miska said she is physically attacked and raped while working at least two times a year, if not more.
  Miska waits for a moto-taxi on the street after leaving the safe house. Miska hopes to one day stop being a sex worker and own her own restaurant because she loves to cook.
 The pain inflicted upon them by an unwelcoming society does not stop many warias from building their own communities and working together toward the dream of an Indonesia that accepts and embraces their existence.  A group of warias at Mami Yuli's waria safehouse outside of Jakarta.
 Mumun, who lives permanently at the safehouse, helps a young waria, Intan, put on make-up. Mumun, like many warias, worked as a sex worker and then when she got older became a cosmetologist. Intan is currently working as a sex worker. 
 A group of young warias play around at Mami Yuli's salon in Jakarta. Mami's salon is known through out Jakarta as the heart of the waria community. 
 Miska smokes a cigarette at a corner store across from the railroad tracks. The specific section of railroad tracks she works on is for waria prostitutes only. They work to keep out any "real women" prositutes. 
 Intan and her boyfriend cuddle up to each other at Miska's home. Intan says that she hopes to one day live again as a "normal male". 
 Miska walks down the street on her way to work at the railroad tracks on a rainy night.
 Oma, a 71-year-old waria, sits on a bed in the safehouse. Oma quit wearing traditional women's clothing years ago because she feels to old to do it anymore, but said she will always be a woman in her soul. Aging is hard in the waria community. Many warias are disowned by their families and if they reach old age they have no where to go. 

Waria is the Indonesian word for a transgender woman. It is a mix between the word pria, which means man, and wanita, which means woman. 

Indonesia has a long history of warias. Before colonialism many tribes embraced their transgender members. They were seen in society as spiritual beings, as people who had two souls occupying one body.

Miska, a transgender sex worker, rides a public bus to work. She works on the tracks of a running train every night.

The life of a waria in Indonesia today is much different. They are not seen as people by the majority of society. 

People walk by a group of warias gathered for and LGTBQ rally in the city center of Jarkata. Visibility and recognition of the gay and waria communities in Jakarta  has increased, but there is still a long way to go until they are seen and treated as equal.

Miska begins putting on her makeup before at her home. The makeup application is a very important ritual for a waria. Miska doesn't wear makeup when she is at home, but always puts it on before leaving the house. 

There are common threads in the lives of many warias. Sex work is one, mainly because there aren't many job opportunities for warias who live openly. They are seen as sex objects by men, or as a spectacle at nightclubs. They are often the victims of sexual violence and homicide. 

Miska, right, and a friend sit on the edge of the train tracks waiting for clients. Miska said she is physically attacked and raped while working at least two times a year, if not more.

 Miska waits for a moto-taxi on the street after leaving the safe house. Miska hopes to one day stop being a sex worker and own her own restaurant because she loves to cook.

The pain inflicted upon them by an unwelcoming society does not stop many warias from building their own communities and working together toward the dream of an Indonesia that accepts and embraces their existence.

A group of warias at Mami Yuli's waria safehouse outside of Jakarta.

Mumun, who lives permanently at the safehouse, helps a young waria, Intan, put on make-up. Mumun, like many warias, worked as a sex worker and then when she got older became a cosmetologist. Intan is currently working as a sex worker. 

A group of young warias play around at Mami Yuli's salon in Jakarta. Mami's salon is known through out Jakarta as the heart of the waria community. 

Miska smokes a cigarette at a corner store across from the railroad tracks. The specific section of railroad tracks she works on is for waria prostitutes only. They work to keep out any "real women" prositutes. 

Intan and her boyfriend cuddle up to each other at Miska's home. Intan says that she hopes to one day live again as a "normal male". 

Miska walks down the street on her way to work at the railroad tracks on a rainy night.

Oma, a 71-year-old waria, sits on a bed in the safehouse. Oma quit wearing traditional women's clothing years ago because she feels to old to do it anymore, but said she will always be a woman in her soul. Aging is hard in the waria community. Many warias are disowned by their families and if they reach old age they have no where to go. 

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